Your Living Garden

When you create your healing garden be sure to include as many opportunities as possible or encouraging life. I don’t necessarily mean wildlife if you live in an area where larger animals naturally roam e.g. opossums, foxes, deer etc.  However, I do mean beneficial insects, bird life and small lizards. If you have a natural healing garden you will notice that it is a haven for all sorts of pollinators, nectar feeders, pest predators and beneficial creatures. If you garden has a good balance of herbal leys, spring blossoms, good soil as well as some shade trees, water features and some sunny spots, then a variety of butterflies, birds, bees, hedgehogs and lizards will visit your garden.

Your fruit trees, vegetable garden and herb beds will benefit from the presence of early spring pollinators. In return your fruit trees will bear healthy fruit, your vegetables won’t need chemical sprays, pests will be suppressed and your soil will stay fertile and friable.
in my own healing garden I’ve noticed an increase in monarch butterflies (see photo above) after I introduced swan plants.  The borage plants under my pear and nashi trees ensure that bees are plentiful in early spring during the brief pear blossom period (see photo above).

Your Living Garden

When you create your healing garden, be sure to include as  many opportunities for encouraging wildlife as possible.  I don’t mean the unwelcome variety such as rodents, opossums, foxes or large predators (if you live in an area where these roam). However, I do mean birdlife, beneficial insects and small lizards. If you have developed a natural healing garden you will notice that it will be a haven for all sorts of pollinators, nectar feeders, pest predators, and beneficial creatures. If your garden has a good balance of herbal leys, spring blossoms, good soil as well as some shade trees, sunny spots and water features, then a variety of butterflies, birds, bees, hedgehogs and lizards will visit your garden. In return your fruit trees will bear healthy fruit, your vegetables won’t need chemical sprays, pest infestations will be suppressed and your soil will stay fertile and friable.
In my own garden where I have a home orchard and herb garden, I’ve noticed an increase in monarch butterflies after I introduced swan plants (see photo below).  The borage plants under my pear and nashi trees ensure that bees are plentiful in early spring during the brief pear blossom period. I have included flax, grevillea, tree ferns and renga renga lily in a woodland corner and now native birds such as tui and fan tails love to play there.
The more life you have in your healing garden, the more you will benefit from its healing properties.

Design a Herb Garden

A herb garden bed is an essential part of your healing garden. Since ancient times, people of all cultures have cultivated herbs for remedial and culinary purposes.  The special properties of herbs have been understood by healers in ancient civilisations, monks in medieval monasteries, shamanic healers of indigenous cultures and therapists of western society. Interest in healing herbs has increased over the last decades as people seek alternatives to chemical medicines or wish to try natural therapies to complement their prescriptions.
I have included a small herb garden (see above) designed in a formal cross shape, in my therapeutic garden. Slightly raised beds and a path of white chip define the rectangular design. A large terracotta strawberry pot in the centre acts as a focal point (I have yet to add a plant to the pot).
In the four beds I have included herbs such as fennel, dill, thyme, pineapple sage, lovage, lemon balm, marjoram and coriander. These are mostly perennial so will fill the beds year round.